Key Investor Information Documents (KIIDs) explained

We have now replaced all Simplified Prospectuses with Key Investor Information Documents (KIIDs). This is to conform with the UCITS IV Directive, a piece of European legislation that applies to investment companies selling funds within the EU.

What is a KIID?

The KIID is a two page document describing the key information for a Fund, such as the nature of the Fund, its charges, and the risks associated with investing in it. Information contained in the KIIDs is required by law and enables easy fund comparison across different asset management companies. Each share class of every M&G OEIC (open-ended investment company) will have a KIID. The KIID replaced the Simplified Prospectus.

What is the difference between a KIID and the Simplified Prospectus?

The Simplified Prospectus provided fund information compiled into one document for each umbrella or stand alone OEIC. A KIID, however, is produced for each individual share class for every fund and are supplied as separate documents.

When did this change happen?

M&G implemented KIIDs on 17 February 2012, after which date the Simplified Prospectus ceased to exist. We are required to provide you with a KIID for each fund and share class you wish to invest in, before you make an investment.

How does this impact the investment process?

After 17 February 2012, you will need to confirm that you have received the relevant KIID(s) before you make an investment.  We will not be able to accept instructions from you without this confirmation.  We will also provide the Important Information for Investors document which you should also read before investing. KIIDs are available on this website via the link at the top of this page.

How will this benefit investors?

It will be much simpler for investors to see the details of each fund at a glance. The regulations are designed to ensure investors have essential information upfront before they invest.

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